Luang Por Ding Khankasuwanno of Wat Bang Wua
Biography of Phra Kru Piboon Khanarak (Ding) of Wat Bang Wua

Luang Por Ding of Wat Bang Wua (also known as Wat Usapharam) in Chachoengsao province was one of the most renowned monks of the past. His sacred objects and amulets are highly sought after by Buddhist devotees and collectors of religious artifacts. Today, they are extremely rare and highly prized by those who possess them. Among his most notable creations are the “carved monkeys” made from the roots of the rak and pootsorn trees, renowned for their powerful spiritual properties.

Phra Kru Piboon Khanarak, commonly known as Luang Por Ding Khankasuwanno, was the former abbot of Wat Bang Wua, also known as Wat Usapharam, in Chachoengsao province. He was born in Bang Wua, Bang Pakong District, Chachoengsao, on March 14, 1877. When he reached the age of ordination in 1897, he was ordained as a Buddhist monk.

Luang Por Ding was ordained at Wat Bang Wua, with Phra Ajarn Dit from Wat Bang Samak as his preceptor, Phra Ajarn Chang from Wat Bang Samak as his ordination teacher, and Phra Ajarn Plod from Wat Bang Wua as his mentor. He was given the monastic name “Khankasuwanno,” which auspiciously means “one whose mind is cool and serene like a river, and strong like gold.” From that moment on, he remained in the monkhood until the end of his life, passing away in 1952.

According to records that Luang Por Ding shared with his close disciples, he spent only one rainy season at Wat Traimitr Withayaram. During that time, Phra Athikan Pia, the abbot of Wat Bang Wua, passed away. The monks and laypeople of the temple held a meeting and decided to invite Luang Por Ding to return and assume the position of abbot. Respecting the faith and devotion of the laypeople, he accepted the position and returned to Wat Bang Wua to serve as its abbot from then on.

In 1900, just three years after his ordination, Luang Por Ding became the abbot of Wat Bang Wua. Upon assuming this position, he began to develop and restore the various structures in the temple, which had been deteriorating over time. He also promoted the study of Buddhist scriptures (pariyatti dhamma) for monks and novices.

Luang Por Ding often shared with his close disciples that he had three main teachers who significantly influenced his learning:

  1. Luang Por Dit Brahmasaro of Wat Bang Samak, who was his preceptor.
  2. Luang Por Pern of Wat Ban Kao in Ban Kao Subdistrict, Phan Thong District, Chonburi Province. He was highly skilled and even reputed for subduing foreigners who came to spread Christianity to the point where they submitted to him. It was said that when foreigners fired guns at the ordination hall of Wat Ban Kao, the bullets did not go off.
  3. Luang Por Poe of Wat Chuan Khuen Khan (believed to be Wat Chuan or currently known as Wat Chuan Darong Ratchapolkhan) in Phra Pradaeng District, Samut Prakan Province. He was highly proficient in herbal medicine and traditional medicine.

Luang Por Ding was a monk who adhered strictly to monastic disciplines, possessed a compassionate heart, and was highly proficient in various fields, including incantations and Buddhist magic that he had studied from renowned masters of his time. These included Phra Ajarn Dit of Wat Bang Samak in Chachoengsao, Luang Por Pern of Wat Ban Kao in Chonburi, and Luang Por Poe (Luang Por Peah) of Wat Chuan Khuen Khan in Samut Prakan. He was highly respected, loved, and revered by Buddhist devotees and had numerous disciples.

His sacred objects were known for their powerful spiritual properties and were highly sought after by collectors. Apart from his “carved wooden monkeys,” his “first batch amulet coins from 1938” are also highly prized and sought after by collectors.

Today, his last prominent disciple, Luang Pu Foo Atipatto of Wat Bang Samak in Chachoengsao, continues his legacy. Luang Pu Foo is also a renowned monk in the eastern region, with numerous disciples and followers.

hanuman lp ding

Hanuman Amulets

Among the various sacred amulets, there is one type known as the “Carved Monkey” or “Carved Hanuman,” which is famously associated with only three renowned temples. These are the carved monkey amulet by Luang Por Ding of Wat Bang Wua in Chachoengsao, the carved Hanuman by Luang Por Sun of Wat Sala Khun in Nonthaburi, and the Ongkot by Luang Por Pan of Wat Bang Krasaub in Samut Prakan.

The sacred objects and amulets created by Phra Kru Piboon Khanarak, or Luang Por Ding, the former abbot of Wat Bang Wua, have been highly coveted by Buddhist devotees and collectors of religious artifacts, both in the past and present. They are considered rare and difficult to find today because their owners highly cherish them. Particularly notable is the “Carved Monkey” amulet, made from the roots of the love tree and the jasmine tree, which is believed to hold significant spiritual power.

Most people who possess the carved monkey amulet by Luang Por Ding also recite a special Hanuman mantra associated with him. They begin by chanting the “Namo” prayer three times, followed by the mantra: “Hanumana Nama Pata.” The method for using this mantra involves chanting according to the day of the week, for example, 10 times on Saturday, 6 times on Sunday, 15 times on Monday, 8 times on Tuesday, and so on.

When visiting a superior, the amulet should be dipped in sandalwood oil and used to mark the forehead. When visiting a lover, the amulet should be dipped in sandalwood oil and circled around the navel clockwise. For visiting a man, the amulet should be dipped in sandalwood oil and circled around the navel counterclockwise.

If you want to make everyone in a house fall asleep, the amulet should be enchanted with the mantra according to the day of the week and placed on the main pillar of the house. Everyone in the house will fall asleep under the influence of Hanuman.

To confuse an enemy, the amulet should be held in the mouth while chanting the mantra according to the day of the week. Blowing air out afterward will leave the enemy dazed and bewildered.